Safety tips for the Flu Season

Safety tips for the Flu Season

The “flu” is a contagious respiratory illness that is caused by a virus that infects the nose, throat, and sometimes lungs. Although symptoms in some people are mild, the flu can cause severe illness and even death. Older adults are at a higher risk for serious flu complications, especially if they already have pre-existing medical conditions. People aged 65 years and older account for 50-70% of flu-related hospitalizations, and 70-90% of flu-related deaths. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu shot every year at the start of the flu season.

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First Aid Tips and Tricks

First Aid Tips and Tricks

Though it is not always possible to predict when an emergency or medical situation will happen, it is still vital to know how to respond to them safely as it can be critical in saving someone’s life. You can increase a person’s chances of survival during a life-threatening emergency by familiarizing yourself with how to use an AED, administer first aid, perform the Heimlich maneuver, and give life-saving medications like naloxone. In the case of a medical emergency, it's easy to assume that someone else will rise to the plate and help the person in distress, however, this is not always going to happen. So, here are some skills worth familiarizing yourself with so you will be equipped to act when an emergency medical situation occurs.

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Veterans Day Safety Tips

Veterans Day Safety Tips

Veteran’s Day, also known as ‘Armistice Day,’ was first celebrated on 11 November 1919, to mark the first anniversary of the end of WWI. Armistice Day became a federal holiday on 13 May 1938, when President Woodrow Wilson enacted the law and dedicated it to all American veterans. Veterans Day is widely viewed as the beginning of the winter safety campaign. The following safety tips are offered to prepare a seasonal mindset change to ensure a safe veterans Day Weekend:

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CPR BPM and Songs to do CPR to

CPR BPM and Songs to do CPR to

When performing CPR chest compressions, the best way to maintain the optimal speed is to follow the beat of a popular song. If you have taken a CPR course or are ready for any tutorials on the subject, you’ve probably heard the Bee Gees Stayin’ Alive used as a popular example. It is a good example and an easy beat to follow. The song clocks in at a steady 104 beats per minute. CPR should always be performed at a pace between 100 and 120 beats per minute.

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